Rheosorbilact in complex intensive therapy of burn toxemia

Authors

  • G Khamraeva Center for Development of Professional Qualifications of Medical Workers, Tashkent, Uzbekistan
  • Kh Mukhitdinova Center for Development of Professional Qualifications of Medical Workers, Tashkent, Uzbekistan
  • G Alauatdinova Center for Development of Professional Qualifications of Medical Workers, Tashkent, Uzbekistan

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.31636/prmd.v4i2.4

Keywords:

Rheosorbilact, infusion therapy, toxemia, burn disease

Abstract

Background.  Thermal injuries primarily cause coagulation necrosis and cell death with vascular thrombosis in the areas of the deepest lesion.
Objective.  To study the effectiveness of rheosorbilact in infusion therapy during the period of burn toxemia.
Materials and Methods. The results of monitoring the daily volume of the injected fluid, infusion therapy and renal excretory activity of 25 patients admitted to the Department of Combustiology of Republican Research Center of Emergency Medicine due to burn injury were studied.
Results. The average daily volume of infusion therapy in group 1, FI – 119.4 ± 38.4 units at the age of 27.3 ± 5.6 years, was 76 ± 7 ml/kg per day, in group 2 (50.7 ± 7.1 years), FI – 92.5 ± 20.8 units, the introduction of 64 ± 9 ml/kg was effective, in group 3 (71.3 ± 7.0 years), FI – 86.7 ± 12.8 units, the introduction of an average of 48 ± 11 ml/kg per day was sufficient. In the nonlinear nature of changes in intravenous infusion, 4–5-day periods can be noted, probably due to the current factors that determined the need to increase or decrease infusion therapy. The introduction of rheosorbilact in a volume of 10 ml/kg per day increased the hourly renal excretory activity in all patients during the period of toxemia. The diuretic effect was more pronounced in patients of group 1, which corresponded to a greater volume of water load and the severity of burn injury.
Conclusions. The introduction of rheosorbilact in a volume of 10 ml/kg per day increased the hourly renal excretory activity in all patients during the period of toxemia.

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References

Background. Thermal injuries primarily cause coagulation necrosis and cell death with vascular thrombosis in the areas of the deepest lesion.

Objective. To study the effectiveness of rheosorbilact in infusion therapy during the period of burn toxemia.

Materials and Methods. The results of monitoring the daily volume of the injected fluid, infusion therapy and renal excretory activity of 25 patients admitted to the Department of Combustiology of Republican Research Center of Emergency Medicine due to burn injury were studied.

Results. The average daily volume of infusion therapy in group 1, FI – 119.4 ± 38.4 units at the age of 27.3 ± 5.6 years, was 76 ± 7 ml/kg per day, in group 2 (50.7 ± 7.1 years), FI – 92.5 ± 20.8 units, the introduction of 64 ± 9 ml/kg was effective, in group 3 (71.3 ± 7.0 years), FI – 86.7 ± 12.8 units, the introduction of an average of 48 ± 11 ml/kg per day was sufficient. In the nonlinear nature of changes in intravenous infusion, 4–5-day periods can be noted, probably due to the current factors that determined the need to increase or decrease infusion therapy. The introduction of rheosorbilact in a volume of 10 ml/kg per day increased the hourly renal excretory activity in all patients during the period of toxemia. The diuretic effect was more pronounced in patients of group 1, which corresponded to a greater volume of water load and the severity of burn injury.

Conclusions. The introduction of rheosorbilact in a volume of 10 ml/kg per day increased the hourly renal excretory activity in all patients during the period of toxemia.

Реосорбілакт у комплексній інтенсивній терапії токсемії опікової хвороби

Published

2021-11-24

How to Cite

1.
Khamraeva G, Mukhitdinova K, Alauatdinova G. Rheosorbilact in complex intensive therapy of burn toxemia. prmd [Internet]. 2021 Nov. 24 [cited 2021 Dec. 5];4(2):24-31. Available from: https://perioperative.org.ua/index.php/prtmdc/article/view/80

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Original article